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The debate over Mars:

Since space.com built up a kind of editorial alliance with the SETI project, a policy change is obviously at work on this site which was formerly very informative. Some topics are not to be mentioned anymore, or some topics need to be dismissed whatever the lack of honesty it implies.

Information suppression:

Sir Arthur C. Clarke took the opportunity of his recent face-to-face meeting with Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin, the first 33░ Scottish Rite Freemason to walk on the surface of the Moon to drop his bombshell statement in a www.space.com story.

While Buzz Aldrin listened, Clarke dropped:

"I'm fairly convinced that we have discovered life on Mars, there are some incredible photographs from [the Jet Propulsion Laboratory], which to me are pretty convincing proof of the existence of large forms of life on Mars! Have a look at them. I don't see any other interpretation."

Clarke's flat statement stunned Aldrin into silence.

At the very least, he seems to be arguing that we need a new view of our solar system, something that a lot of more or less serious researchers have advocated for decades. Unfortunately, he refers to images of alleged "glass pipes" on Mars which are most likely natural formation, which have nothing "glassy" and are not "tubes" at all, and "bushes" which are also possibly not bushes but traces of permafrost sublimation. Sir Clarke does not mention any other more interesting features.

Whatsoever, the interesting part is that his statement raised enthusiastic comments from those investing time in research of anomalous features on Mars, and those like me who are trying to present to a large public the numerous evidence that at least a microbial life still exists on Mars. At last, a well-known figure expressed "something" to a large audience.

Unfortunately, a few days later, no trace was left on the space.com server: no link exist anymore on the main page, or the main page's so called "SETI" menu, those who built a link to the interview page are confronted with the infamous "error 404: page not found", a query on space.com's search engine allows you to find a leftover mention of this interview, but "error 404" is the answer when you hope to access it.

I find this and other recent similar behavior of the space.com website very telling...

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This page was last updated on May 5, 2001