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UFOs in the daily Press:

French Chinese lanterns in 1954:

The article below was published in the daily newspaper Le Nouveau Nord Maritime, France, page 9, on October 6, 1954.

Scan

A retired miner
of Pas-de-Calais
manufactured all
kinds of gear
able from a distance
to give the illusion
of aerial
phenomena

A while ago mysterious debris were found in a field near Sailly-Labourse. One wondered what this debris from some craft could be, and appearing to be a hot air balloon. One found large paper sheets stuck to the base. At the valve there were remains of burnt tow. The gendarmerie brigades of the region investigated and discovered that it is a retired minor, of Portuguese nationality, Henri d'Oliveira, who manufactured all kinds of gear of different shapes with wooden sticks and paper.

He would have released several thousand of them, of all kinds and of all sizes.

In his hangar there was also a magnificent saucer ready to be inflated and ready to go.

Flying saucers
in the Boulonnais

Boulogne-sur-Mer, 5. - Mr. Marcel Thiébaut, engineer, residing at 74, rue Emile Lemaître in Boulogne, told the representative of our colleague, the "Journal" of Boulogne:

"It was around 8:30 p.m. Sunday evening, when returning by car to Boulogne, I saw in the distance on the plateau of Tingry, Two luminous discs, red in color.

"At first I thought it was an optical illusion, and maybe it was a sounding balloon.

"I stopped my car and my family noticed like myself that there were in the sky, at a very approximate height of 700 to 800 meters above the ground, two saucers with very clear and well defined contours.

"They were both on a vertical plane and disappeared from time to time.

"This phenomenon, to which I refuse to give a name, was clearly visible for 30 minutes.

"Besides, other motorists stopped and looked at these luminous vehicles with me."

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