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The 1954 French flap:

The index page for the 1954 French flap section of this site is here.

October 12, 1954, Léguevin, Haute-Garonne:

Reference number for this case: 12-oct-54-Léguevin. Thank you for including this reference number in any correspondence with me regarding this case.

Reports:

[Ref. er1:] "L'EST REPUBLICAIN" NEWSPAPER:

The daily (and varied) chronicle of the saucers

The secret papers of the Martian spy were only flying leaves abandoned to the wind

Paris. -- The record of flying saucers was further increased by several testimonies, one from a mechanic from Léguevin (the Haute-Garonne), let the gendarmes and the military authorities think for a few hours that they were in presence neither more nor less of a case of espionage!

Jean Marty, 42, rushed Wednesday morning to the gendarmerie brigade to inform the representatives of the law of his strange discovery.

"I was working last night in my studio, on the roadside of Toulouse, when I noticed near Léguevin a kind of luminous disk that seemed to float in the air. It Was not more than 5 meters from the ground, but as soon as I approached, it rose noiselessly to the vertical and disappeared."

"Intrigued, I approached the place where it had to land and my attention was suddenly drawn to the middle of the field by two sheets of white glossy paper covered with printed letters, and I picked them up carefully."

"But, it's Chinese!"

The gendarmes leaned over, intrigued, onto the pieces of evidence. The sheets, commercial-type, were neither stained, nor damp, nor wrinkled, but of absolute clarity, as if they had just been torn from a new brochure.

"But it's Chinese!" exclaimed one of the gendarmes. Fortunately Léguevin counts among its residents a brave soldier in retirement and polyglot, Mr. Maggy. It was a text written in an Annamese dialect, the Kuoc-Nn. The sheets are numbered 9-10 and 59-60, they come from a brochure reproducing an off-set, A typewritten document, but be careful, Mr. Maggy concludes gravely, "I do not understand everything, it's about Vietminh and Vietnam."

This peremptory statement was enough to trigger a genuine investigation, the gendarmerie handing the two sheets revealing no doubt of an important espionage affair between the Martians, the Indochinese and the French, to military authorities.

Do not lose your papers

It was air safety that took the matter into its own hands and did it fast. A duly qualified translator was summoned, who, after a few moments of examination, made it difficult to find an irresistible desire to laugh. "These leaves come from a brochure published by the services of Prince Buu-Loc, they were undoubtedly left in Leguevin by Vietnamese who came... to picnic!" The Vietnamese students are particularly numerous in Toulouse, and Léguevin, located about twenty kilometers away and close to the wooded areas of the Gers, offers to Toulouse a sought after walking area during their weekends. As for the ultra secret text, it deals with fish arrivals in the Indochinese harbors! Morality: do not let your papers around!

The shock of a Toulouse industrialist

The region of Toulouse seems, moreover, to be a ground of predilection for the saucers pilots, because this "case of espionage" was scarcely classified that Mr. Olivier, industrialist in Toulouse, put again the authorities on the move. Wednesday, at 7:35 p.m., in a suburb of the city, Mr. Olivier saw a diaphragm of about 1m20, with a big head and two enormous eyes, which descended from a spherical gear posed in a vacant lot. The character came to him and his diving suit shone like glass. After a minute, he returned to his apparatus and had to bend to climb into it. He disappeared into the sky at a prodigious speed, leaving a trail of fire. "This is quite a shock," concluded Mr. Olivier, still under the thrill of emotion.

The Martian of Montluçon knows only one expression: diesel!

M. Laugere, a railwayman at the station of Montlucon, waited several days to tell his adventure, for he was afraid that his comrades would laugh at him. But as he saw in the newspapers that an ecnounter with a Martian was not so exceptional, he decided to speak. His story dates back to Sunday evening, Mr. Laugère crossed the tracks near the bridge of the S.N.C.F. on the river "Le Cher", when he saw a metal machine placed at a short distance from a reservoir of gas oil intended for the feeding of railcars. By the side of the apparatus, which had the form of a torpedo, and might have measured four meters, stood a man entirely covered with hair, unless he were dressed in a coat with long hair! Mr. Laugere, surprised, asked him what he was doing. The unknown replied in unintelligible terms, but the railwayman seemed to distinguish the words "diesel". The railwayman wished to return to the station to give the alarm, but scarcely had he made a hundred yards when he saw the apparatus rise vertically without noise.

[Ref. sp1:] "THE STAR PRESS" NEWSPAPER:

Scan

France, Too, 'Invaded' By Martians

Paris (UP) -- A flying saucer epidemic has Frenchmen seeing men from Mars.

The other evening in the Lorraine village of Waldscheid a terrified band of youngsters stampeded homeward to report that the men from Mars had landed in a villager's garden. Womenfolk dashed into the village church, hoping for Divine sanctuary.

The men grabbed scythes, clubs, and the few available guns and marched against the Martians. They marched to the garden. There stood the invaders, half human size, heads glowing motionless. Turned out they were big-blossomed chrysanthemums the resident had covered with brilliant cloth against the frost.

The Standard Model

When the big scale visitation from the outer reaches began, the flying saucer was the standard model. Since then luminous cigars, frying pans, discs, melone and even bells have hurtled through the French skies in increasing numbers.

Within the week the villagers of Momy (Basses-Pyrenees) took to the fields with makeshift weapons to deal with a flying saucer freshly arrived. They found a hollow pumpkin with a candle burning inside.

Two nights earlier a farmer in the Bordeaux area stopped to repair his car on a lonely road, and narrowly missed death when a resident mistook him for a celestial invader and fired both barrels of his shotgun at him.

Ten days ago Gilbert Lelay told his parents at Chateaubriant that a little Martian stepped from a flying cigar and readily gave him permission to look at it, but warned him not to touch it.

Near Toulouse, a mechanic, Jean Marty, 43, informed police he saw an orange saucer land near his home. It soon zoomed away into the night, but Marty found two sheets of paper on the ground, covered with cryptic markings which none could deny might be Martian literature.

The weekly magazine Express offered a reward of 10,000,000 Francs ($28.570) to the first person bringing a real live Martian to its office.

The more scholarly newspaper Le Monde, lamenting on the rash of flying saucers, mourned in print for "the days of our well beloved sea serpent."

[Ref. mc1:] MICHEL CARROUGES:

The author indicates that there was a testimony of Mr. Marty in Léguevin, but dating of October 12, 1954, and being distant from Toulouse, it should not have been caused by the pranks of the journalists of Samedi-Soir.

[Ref. jv5:] JACQUES VALLEE:

312 -001.23471 43.59960 12 10 1954 LEGUEVIN HT-GARONNE F 001 I

[Ref. gl1:] CHARLES GARREAU AND RAYMOND LAVIER:

These two French ufologists note a case which took place in Leguevin in the Haute-Garonne on October 12, 1954, with reference to the listing by Jacques Vallée and the ufology magazine "Lumières Dans La Nuit" for December 1969.

They note that the information is sparse: Jean Marty, aged 42, who was in his craftsman shop, saw the landing of a luminous disc of approximately 6 m 50 of diameter and 2 m 50 of hieght. He tried to approach it but then the machine rose vertically at a speed qualified as "astonishing" by the witness.

[Ref. jv1:] JACQUES VALLEE:

244

Oct. 12, 1954, 10:30 P.M., Leguevin (France).

Jean Marty, 42, mechanic, was in his shop when he saw a luminous disk about 6.5 m diameter and 2.5 m thick, land. He tried to approach it, but the craft rose vertically and silently at an amazing speed. (Paris-Presse, Libération, 15 oct 1954, La Croix, 16 Oct 1954) (62, 63).

[Ref. jv2:] JACQUES VALLEE:

The author indicates that on October 12, 1954, in Léguevin in the Toulouse area, a mechanic who was in his workshop at night saw a luminous disc on the ground, of approximately 6 or 7 meters diameter and 2 meters 50 in thickness. The witness tried to approach, but it rose vertically at a fantastic speed.

[Ref. jb1:] JACQUES BONABOT:

J. Bonabot reports that once the disk had left, the witness found two sheets of glossy white paper on the ground, covered with printed characters. They were two sheets of a booklet written "in Indochineses" (Vietnamese) who mentionned ships arrivals in a Vietnamese harbour and related fish delivery.

[Ref. fr1:] MICHEL FIGUET AND JEAN-LOUIS RUCHON:

The two authors indicate that in Leguevin in Haute-Garonne, on October 12, 1954 at 10:30 p.m., the witness, Jean Marty, aged 42, mechanic, worked in his workshop located on the road of Toulouse at 1 km 500 of Leguevin when he looked up, saw a circular and orange luminous object which came to land in a field. Amazed, he went out, he crossed the road and moved towards the disc whichthen rose high in the airs, without noise, vertically, and disappeared at an extraordinary speed.

The witness then reached the middle of the field to seek a possible trace and discovered none, but found, posed on the grass, two sheets of white glazed paper, with printed letters in Vietnamese writing.

After investigation these papers seemed to have been forgotten there by a group of Vietnamese who had lunch in the field.

The sources are indicated as the Vallée catalogue, case 244; C. Garreau and R. Lavier in "Face aux ET" page 109; Michel Carrouges in "Les apparitions de Martiens" page 166; La Croix for October 15, 1954; Les Echos for October 15, 1954; Paris-Presse for October 15, 1954; Libération for October 15, 1954.

[Ref. lg1] LOREN GROSS - UNKNOWN US NEWSPAPER:

Scan

November 2, 1954

French Have Epidemic Of Disks

By Priscilla Buckley

PARIS, (UP). -- A flying saucer epidemic has Frenchmen seeing men from Mars.

The other evening in the Lorraine village of Waldscheid a terrified band of youngsters stampeded homeward to report that the men from Mars had landed in a villager's garden. Womenfolk dashed into the church, hoping for divine sanctuary.

The men grabbed scythes, clubs, and the few available guns and marched against the garden. There stood the invaders, half human size, heads glowing motionless.

Turned out they were big chrysanthemums the resident had covered with brilliant cloth against the frost.

When the big scale visitation from the outer reaches began, the flying saucer was the model. Since then, luminous cigars, frying pans, disks, melons and even bells have hurtled through the French skies in increasing numbers.

Within the week the villagers of Momy (Basses-Pyrenees) took to the fled with makeshift weapons to deal with a flying saucer freshly arrived. They found a hollow pumpkin with a candle burning inside.

Two nights earlier a farmer in the Bordeaux area stopped to repair his car on a lonely road, and narrowly missed death when a resident mistook him for a celestial invader and fired both barrels of his shotgun at him.

Ten days ago Gilbert Lelay told his parents at Chateaubriant that a little Martian stepped from a flying cigar and readily gave him permission to look at it, but warned him not to touch it.

Near Toulouse, a mechanic, Jean Marty, 43, informed police he saw an orange saucer land near his home. It soon zoomed away into the night, but Marty found two sheets of paper on the ground, covered with cryptic markings which none could deny could be Martian literature.

The weekly magazine express [L'Express] offered a reward of 10 million francs ($28.570) to the first person bringing a real live Martian to its offices.

The more scholarly newspaper Le monde, lamenting the rash of flying saucers, mourned in print for "the days of our well beloved sea serpent."

[Ref. lg2] LOREN GROSS:

Estimates of "landings" in the saucer epidemic run as high as 100 in France and that may be not be anywhere near the true number. Amid all this fuss it was often the oddest story that got the most attention. Checking over a stack of news clippings, Nexus editor James Moseley singled out this one:

"In Haute-Garonne a gendarme reported watching a saucer land in a field and seeing a troop of Martians 'the size of ten-year-old boys' deploy through the trees. The saucer was gone when the villagers got to the scene, and so were the Martians,but some papers were discovered lying on the ground. Savants of the University of Toulouse were asked to study them to see if this might be a Martian declaration of war. After some anxious hours, the documents turned out to be written in a dialect of Indo-Chinese. They had been dropped by some Indo-Chinese students on a picnic two days earlier." 229.

  • "Current Saucer Reports: French and Italian Landings." Book I. January 1955. p.2.

[Ref. go1:] GODELIEVE VAN OVERMEIRE:

The Belgian ufologist indicates that in 1954, on October 12 in France in Leguevin, "Jean Marty was still in his shop at 10:30 p.m. when he saw a luminous disc approximately 6,50 m in diameter and 2, 50 m thickness, which lands. He tried to approach but the craft rose vertically in silence at an astonishing speed."

She indicates the sources of the above as "Paris-Presse, Libération, 15 Oct 1954, La Croix, 16 Oct 1954" and "Jacques Vallée: 'Chronique des apparitions ET' - DENOEL 1972 - J'AI LU COLL. - p. 278".

She adds that another version says: "Mr. Jean Marty witness of the landing of a luminous disc. After the disappearance of this craft the witness discovers "posed on the grass" two sheets of smoothed blank paper, covered with printed characters. They were two sheets of a booklet written in Indochinese mentioning the entries of ships in the harbour of Indo-China as well as the fish arrivals."

Elle indique que les sources de cette autre version sont "GESAG sous.cat. de cat. n° 465, 'La Libre Belgique 15.10.54, Paris-Soir 15.10.54, La Croix 16.10.54 et Paris-Presse 15 et 16.10.54".

[Ref. fb1:] FABRICE BONVIN:

Fabrice Bonvin notes:

Case #022: 12/10/1954, P. 155 (Leguevin)

[Ref. dj1:] DONALD JOHNSON:

On this Day

October 12

[...]

1954 - Jan Marty, age 42, a mechanic, was in his shop in Leguevin, France when he saw a luminous disc land. It was about 6.5 meters in diameter and 2.5 meters thick. He tried to approach it, but the craft rose vertically and silently at an amazing speed. (Source: Jacques Vallee, Passport to Magonia: A Century of Landings, p. 226).

[Ref. jb1:] JEROME BEAU:

Tuesday October 12, 1954

[...]

10:30 p.m. In Leguevin (France), Jean Marty (42-year-old, craftsman) is in the shop when he sees 1 luminous disc approximately 6,50 m in diameter and 2,5 m thickness, which lands. He tries to approach but the craft rises vertically in silence at an astonishing speed.

[...]

The sources are noted "Paris-Presse, Libération, October 15, 1954" "La Croix, October 16, 1954".

[Ref. lc1:] LUC CHASTAN:

Luc Chastan indicates that in the Haute Garonne in Leguevin on October 12, 1954, "the witness works in his workshop located on the road of Toulouse at 1 km 500 of Leguevin. He sees at 22:30, while looking up, a circular and orange luminous object which is posed in a field. Intrigued, he comes out, crosses the road and moves towards the disc which then rises in the airs, without noise, vertically, and disappears at an extraordinary speed. The witness goes into the center of the field to seek a possible trace. He discovered none, but found, posed on grass, two layers of glazed paper, white, covered with printed chracters in Indo-chinese. After investigation the latter seem to have be forgotten there by a group of Vietnamese who had a picnic in the fields."

The source is indicated as "Ovni, Premier dossier complet... by Figuet M./ Ruchon J.L. ** Alain Lefeuvre pub. 1979".

[Ref. ud1:] "UFODNA" WEBSITE:

The website indicates that on 12 October 1954 at 22:30, in Leguevin, France, "Jan Marty, 42, mechanic, was in his shop when he saw a luminous disk about 6."

The website adds: "Jan Marty, age 42, a mechanic, was in his shop in Leguevin, France when he saw a luminous disc land. It was about 6.5 meters in diameter and 2.5 meters thick. He tried to approach it, but the craft rose vertically and silently at an amazing speed."

And: "Jan Marty, 42, mechanic, was in his shop when he saw a luminous disk about 6.5 meters diameter and 2.5 meters thick, land. He tried to approach it, but the craft rose vertically and silently at an amazing speed."

And: "An object was observed. Traces found. One saucer, about 20 feet across, was observed by two male witnesses, typical age 42, in a residential area briefly."

The sources are indicated as Lorenzen, Coral E., Flying Saucer Occupants, Signet T3205, New York, 1967; Lorenzen, Coral E., Encounters with UFO Occupants, Berkley Medallion, New York, 1976, ISBN:425-03093-8; Bowen, Charles, The Humanoids: FSR Special Edition No. 1, FSR, London, 1966; Vallee, Jacques, Computerized Catalog (N = 3073); Vallee, Jacques, Challenge to Science: The UFO Enigma, Henry Regnery, Chicago, 1966; Vallee, Jacques, Preliminary Catalog (N = 500), (in JVallee01); Vallee, Jacques, A Century of Landings (N = 923), (in JVallee04), Chicago, 1969; Vallee, Jacques, A Century of Landings (N = 923), (in JVallee04), Chicago, 1969; Schoenherr, Luis, Computerized Catalog (N = 3173); Phillips, Ted R., Ted Phillips investigation files; Phillips, Ted R., Physical Traces Associated with UFO Sightings, CUFOS, Chicago, 1975; Hatch, Larry, *U* computer database, Author, Redwood City, 2002.

[Ref. ni1:] "THE NICAP WEBSITE":

*Oct. 12, 1954 - Jan Marty, age 42, a mechanic, was in his shop in Leguevin, France at 10:30 p.m. when he saw a luminous disc-shaped object land. It was about 6.5 meters in diameter and 2.5 meters thick. He tried to approach it, but the craft rose vertically and silently at an amazing speed. (Source: Jacques Vallee, Passport to Magonia: A Century of Landings, p. 226, case # 244).

[Ref. ub1:] "UFO-DATENBANK":

This database recorded the case 5 times instead of one:

Case Nr. New case Nr. Investigator Date of observation Zip Place of observation Country of observation Hour of observation Classification Comments Identification
19541012 12.10.1954 Leguevin Toulouse France 22.30
19541012 12.10.1954 Leguevin France 22.30 CE I
19541012 12.10.1954 Leguevin France
19541012 12.10.1954 Leguevin France
19541012 12.10.1954 Leguevin Toulouse France CE II

Explanations:

Not looked for yet.

Keywords:

(These keywords are only to help queries and are not implying anything.)

Léguevin, Haute-Garonne, Jean Marty, disc, luminous, landing, fast, silent, vertical, writing

Sources:

[---] indicates sources which I have not yet checked.

Document history:

Version: Created/Changed by: Date: Change Description:
0.1 Patrick Gross April 7, 2003 First published.
1.0 Patrick Gross March 11, 2009 Conversion from HTML to XHTML Strict. First formal version. Additions [go1], [dj1], [jb1], [lc1], [ud1].
1.1 Patrick Gross June 29, 2010 Addition [jv5].
1.2 Patrick Gross November 15, 2014 Addition [ni1].
1.3 Patrick Gross November 25, 2016 Additions [lg1], [ub1].
1.4 Patrick Gross December 13, 2016 Addition [lg2].
1.5 Patrick Gross September 18, 2017 Additions [sp1].

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